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This Hour: Latest South Dakota news, sports, business and entertainment

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TICK ILLNESS PREVENTION

Epidemiologist: Prevent tick-borne illnesses

PIERRE, S.D. (AP) - South Dakota's state epidemiologist recommends that residents use repellent and frequent checks to prevent tick-borne illnesses such as tularemia and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

Dr. Lon Kightlinger says ticks need to be attached for several hours to spread infection so people can reduce their risk by checking for and removing ticks right away. Residents can also tuck pants into socks and spray clothes and exposed skin with tick repellent to further reduce risk.

The department in 2013 investigated four cases of Lyme disease, seven cases of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, seven cases of tularemia and one case each of ehrlichiosis and babesiosis.

The Ioxdes deer tick that carries Lyme disease prefers heavily forested areas in Wisconsin and Minnesota, so most areas of South Dakota are not suitable habitat.

FATAL CRASH PLEA

Lantry man pleads guilty to causing fatal crash

A 20-year-old Lantry man has pleaded guilty to causing an accident that killed his passenger.

Court documents indicate Charg Hebb pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter, which has a maximum punishment of a year in custody.

Prosecutors say he was speeding and driving recklessly on the wrong side of the road and collided head-on with another vehicle. The accident killed his passenger, Arleigh McLellan.

It happened Oct. 12, 2012, near Lantry on the Cheyenne River Sioux Indian Reservation.

Hebb is free until sentencing.

TRIBAL NATIONAL PARK

SD tribe's park expansion for bison irks ranchers

PIERRE, S.D. (AP) - Range land outside of the south unit of Badlands National Park has become contested territory.

The Oglala Sioux Tribe and National Park Service are working on a plan to turn the unit and surrounding land into the first tribal national park.

Opponents of the project, including ranchers using the land, distrust federal involvement in tribal affairs. Some have leased and used the land for decades.

Supporters say the park will allow the tribe to introduce a bison herd and pursue projects outlined nearly 40 years ago. Officials say most of the controversial land belongs to the tribe, which is helping residents find new sites for their ranches.

Public input sessions will take place this Friday in Rapid City and Oglala. Organizers say there is still time for input and compromise.

SENATE-CONTRIBUTIONS

Rounds has clear cash edge heading toward primary

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) - Former South Dakota Gov. Mike Rounds has the clear edge in campaign cash heading toward the June Republican primary for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by retiring Sen. Tim Johnson.

The GOP front-runner had about $1 million in his campaign coffers as of March 31 after raising about $724,000 during the quarter.

Sole Democratic candidate Rick Weiland had about $485,000 cash on hand offset by campaign debt of nearly $109,000. He raised nearly $204,000.

The quarter's top fundraiser was Republican candidate Annette Bosworth at $772,000, but she pulled the vast majority of the contributions from out-of-state donors and her campaign fell deeper in debt during the quarter.

About 60 percent of the itemized contributions raised by Rounds were from out-of-state donors, compared to about 41 percent out-of-staters for Weiland.

AUTUMN STORM-ELECTRIC CO-OP

SD electric co-op getting aid for storm repairs

PIERRE, S.D. (AP) - An electric cooperative in western South Dakota is getting more than $20 million to help cover damages caused by an early October blizzard.

South Dakota's Office of Emergency Management and the Federal Emergency Management Agency are making the award to Grand Electric Cooperative. The money will help reimburse the co-op for repair or replacement of power lines and more than 1,500 poles damaged by the storm in Butte, Corson, Harding, Meade, Perkins and Ziebach counties.

Just under $18 million is coming from the federal government, which is covering 75 percent of the cost. The state's 10 percent share is nearly $2.4 million. Grand Electric is contributing 15 percent, or about $3.6 million.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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